Why can’t I print from Google photos?

I love Google Photos as a means off backing up and sharing photos. On the Mac it requires minimal configuration and works without supervision and it is easy to share albums and photos. So I’m really puzzled why there is no way to print photos.

Google photos byline is “Free storage and automatic organization for all your memories.” and the software works! It appears to be written professionally – so perhaps a team from outside Google made it originally – I kid, I kid.

The auto uploader is easy to configure and non-intrusive. I tell it where my photos are and it silently looks for new ones, de-duplicates them and streams all my personal photos into google’s servers.  Wait. God! I just re-read that last sentence slowly. It’s too late now. … Anyway

Google’s statistical learning algorithms do some semi-useful things like image categorization and some cute things like animations with music which are nice but not essential or something I use often. I haven’t looked, but I assume that there is a way to bulk download if I ever need to recover the photos.

Update: Google photo is pretty much just a web only photo sharing service. The quality of the stored photos is OK for web viewing but does not stand up to closer scrutiny. I would only use this as a “backup” of last resort, a kind of cache in case all other real backups have failed. And I guess that’s why there is no print option – the quality is just too poor to really print.

Screen Shot 2016-10-22 at 7.56.10 PM.pngIn the example above the left image is of the google photos copy at 1:1 and the right is the original photo, also at 1:1. You can clearly see Google photo’s compression artifacts and poorer underlying resolution. There are also software glitches when viewing photos – the web viewer often gets stuck at a very low resolution of the photo, and you have to reload, or otherwise ‘jiggle’ the software to get it working again.

So, imagine my surprise and frustration when I went to print my photos and started to feel like Marcel The Mime stuck in that glass box. I tried to find the print button for two days, searching forums and stack overflow, convinced that it was just hidden and if I was just diligent enough I would find it, perhaps earning $100 in free prints at the end of it.

Once, I ran into a post that said I just needed to log into the Picasa webservice: I’d be able to see the photos I’d uploaded and then select for print. I went to picasaweb, and indeed, found my albums and found the print option. I was overjoyed. I started to collect photos to print. I then navigated away. A few days later I came back and discovered that the design had changed and I no longer had the “Print” button. I realized I was part of a giant psychological experiment which made the events in Gas Light look like kindness.

It was then that a bigger mystery began to occupy my mind. Why do this? Why fuck with your users like this? Why take a course of action that both leaves money on the table and angers users at the same time? I couldn’t stop thinking about it and this post is a form of therapy. I hope it works. So hear me out.

screen-shot-2016-10-09-at-7-34-10-pmNow, Google is desperate to make money from their services.

Whenever I do a search I see a string of ads above my search results that are either identical to my search results or considerably less informative.

Google is sacrificing search result accuracy and user convenience for revenue. Google was earning a healthy ad revenue before it started to advertise so luridly, and so it’s not clear to me why they’ve become so desperate.

screen-shot-2016-10-06-at-11-00-06-am

So, in this context the absence of any way to print photos from Google photos strikes me as particularly odd.

I’m not very experienced in product commercialization, but I imagine that if you create an online photo storage and management service, it’s a net plus to either offer a printing service yourself or, if that takes you too far outside your traditional domain of expertise, have an arrangement with an established photo printing service. Not letting your users print, and being ambiguous about it, is, on the other hand, a net negative.

So, is this lack of functionality malice or stupidity? Let’s take malice first.

When we upload our photos to google’s servers we are giving them intimate personal data. The images are being processed through statistical learning algorithms which can cluster faces and probably recognize backgrounds. We also give Google our personal and professional email. These data streams are a marketers dream. It’s the kind of information that allows Google to insert Ads for baby clothes in emails once you use the word ‘pregnancy’ in an email. In the future one can imagine that Google will insert such ads once you upload photos of your pregnancy to share with family.

Perhaps, though, that fear is overdone, as we can see from the clumsy state of targeted marketing; the brightest minds of our generation, thankfully and contrary to popular perception, have not been occupied in trying to serve ads to us (they have, of course, been occupied in borking our encryption algorithms and back-dooring our router hardware, but that is a matter for a different post) but an army of second rate minds have certainly been trying to productize our personal information.

So, from this point of view, as far as Google is concerned, we are the product and in exchange for some free storage we are giving google an even more complete peek into our personal lives so they can build a better psychological profile of us, so that they may judiciously prey on our deepest insecurities to sell us disposable razors. They don’t care if we can’t print, and they want this fact to be hard to discover. What they really want is us to upload our photos for their analysis.

 

What about stupidity? Google is a big company with many, many failed products. Most of the products failed not because of buggy software but because of a lack of imagination. A basic misunderstanding of what people want their computers to do for them. Like, say, print a bunch of photos into a photo book to give as a gift. The lack of a print facility is, under this hypothesis, just another example of product management sleeping at the helm.

There is of course another option – strategic insight.

Perhaps Google has decided for us that the vast majority of people no longer print photos. Perhaps they have seen into the future and it’s all digital, from the screens on our phones to the screens on our fridges. There will be no more eight-by-ten color glossy pictures of children and of wives and of parents and of halloween parties hanging on our walls, or inserted into albums (real albums, made of cardboard paper and cellophane) to be shown to relatives on thanksgiving. Perhaps we’ll be offering a guest a drink and instead of pulling out an album from our bookcase, we’ll swipe on our refrigerator and say ‘Hey did I show you our wedding photos?’

Well, that’s the future, and it ain’t here yet. I have relatives here and now that want photos of Mom and Dad, and I can’t waste half an hour downloading them and then uploading them to some other service EVERY TIME.

 

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3 thoughts on “Why can’t I print from Google photos?

  1. Alyssa Ferguson says:

    Hmmm and here I thought I was being all innovative “upgrading” to the Google Pixel phone for the photo storage…..never thought about Google photos not having a print option. I also did not know about the compression of photos leading to a less clear photo. This is maddening!!! In the past, when I had my Samsung Galaxy S5, I would physically take the phone to Costco and hook it up to their machines and painstakingly wade through all of my photos deciding which ones to print. I was hoping I would trade this method in for something a little more practical (I mean, with all this technology, things should be getting easier right?!?) but I guess I will continue with my old ways. Ugh I guess my Pixel was a waste of money after all. Should have gone with the Galaxy S7.

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