C++: how to order class declarations

Of course, this is all a matter of opinion. When I started out writing C++ (back in the days of glBegin() and glEnd() ) I followed the convention (which I found in books and example code) of putting all the member variables first, then all the member functions. There was  much hand-wringing about whether the …

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The DNA knows where the DNA comes from

We know that all cells in our bodies carry DNA in their nuclei. To a first order, all the DNA in our bodies is identical (As is normal with biology, there are exceptions, called chimeras which provide much material for the tabloids). However, we know that we are not homogenous blobs of cells of the …

Your microprocessor knows π

When I started out in electrical engineering we were given 8085 kits to play with. It was an 8-bit microprocessor. I used to know the instructions set by heart. I have fond memories of using a ruled college notebook to work out a program to do long division and then keying in the program opcode …

Chebyshev polynomials and Runge’s phenomenon – Computing Orbits (2)

Using polynomial fits to interpolate data can blow up in your face. To avoid this, use the non-uniformly spaced Chebyshev nodes as your fitting control points. For extra bonus bucks, use Chebyshev polynomials.

c++: the named argument tease

I love Python keyword arguments because I forget what the order of the arguments are, because sometimes I want to leave some arguments at default values, because I hate writing boilerplate. That is why I got so excited when I was going through the source code of samtools (If you are not in bioinformatics, for …

C++: Notes on moves and copies

I found the behavior of Objects in STL containers a bit confusing, so I wrote down some notes for myself. (I've updated this post after helpful comments from my colleagues Vladimir Semenyuk and Björn Pollex. They pointed out that I hadn't implemented copy and move constructors in my original code. Hopefully the post now looks …

মৌলিক: A prime number toy

Moulick (মৌলিক - Bengali for Prime) is an Arduino powered mathematical toy that endlessly computes primes and shows fun statistics about them as it goes along. Watching primes born was never more exciting, or slow. Moulik  starts from 2 and takes you primally all the way out to 10 decimal digits at a recklessly unsafe speed …